rhamphotheca:

4 Species of Legless Lizard Discovered in California

by Douglas Main

Four previously unknown species of snakelike creatures have been found in California — but don’t call them snakes; they’re legless lizards. Prior to the discovery of the new species, there was only one known legless lizard species in the state: the California legless lizard.

Surprisingly, the newfound legless lizards were discovered at a series of sites that weren’t exactly pristine: They include a dune bordering a runway at Los Angeles International Airport; an empty lot in downtown Bakersfield, Calif.; a field littered with oil derricks; and the margins of the Mojave Desert…

(read more: Live Science)

photo: Bakersfield legless lizard (Anniella grinnelli), by Alex Krohn

19

September

127 notes

This photo was reblogged from rhamphotheca and originally by rhamphotheca.

defender-of-fandoms:

justjustinnn:

OMG LMFAO WHAT DID I JUST READ.

THIS IS EITHER THE BEST OR THE WORST LOVE STORY I CAN’T DECIDE OMFG.

(Source: alexandrinaionita)

19

September

356,551 notes

This photo was reblogged from genghisben and originally by alexandrinaionita.

16

September

191,579 notes

This photo was reblogged from a-verefiducia and originally by r2--d2.

coolings:

following back similars

coolings:

following back similars

16

September

792 notes

This photo was reblogged from a-verefiducia and originally by coolings.

thescienceofreality:

Rotating Moon from LRO | APOD | Gif Made By: The Science of Reality | Video Credit: LRO, Arizona State U., NASA

No one, presently, sees the Moon rotate like this. That’s because the Earth’s moon is tidally locked to the Earth, showing us only one side. Given modern digital technology, however, combined with many detailed images returned by the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO), a high resolution virtual Moon rotation movie has now been composed. The above time-lapse video starts with the standard Earth view of the Moon. Quickly, though, Mare Orientale, a large crater with a dark center that is difficult to see from the Earth, rotates into view just below the equator. From an entire lunar month condensed into 24 seconds, the video clearly shows that the Earth side of the Moon contains an abundance of dark lunar maria, while the lunar far side is dominated by bright lunar highlands. Two new missions are scheduled to begin exploring the Moon within the year, the first of which is NASA’s Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE). LADEE, which launched just over a week ago, is scheduled to begin orbiting the Moon in October and will explore the thin and unusual atmosphere of the Moon. In a few months, the Chinese Chang’e 3 is scheduled to launch, a mission that includes a soft lander that will dispatch a robotic rover. 

thescienceofreality:

Rotating Moon from LRO | APOD | Gif Made By: The Science of Reality | Video Credit: LROArizona State U.NASA

No one, presently, sees the Moon rotate like this. That’s because the Earth’s moon is tidally locked to the Earth, showing us only one side. Given modern digital technology, however, combined with many detailed images returned by the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO), a high resolution virtual Moon rotation movie has now been composed. The above time-lapse video starts with the standard Earth view of the Moon. Quickly, though, Mare Orientale, a large crater with a dark center that is difficult to see from the Earth, rotates into view just below the equator. From an entire lunar month condensed into 24 seconds, the video clearly shows that the Earth side of the Moon contains an abundance of dark lunar maria, while the lunar far side is dominated by bright lunar highlands. Two new missions are scheduled to begin exploring the Moon within the year, the first of which is NASA’s Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE). LADEE, which launched just over a week ago, is scheduled to begin orbiting the Moon in October and will explore the thin and unusual atmosphere of the Moon. In a few months, the Chinese Chang’e 3 is scheduled to launch, a mission that includes a soft lander that will dispatch a robotic rover. 

16

September

371 notes

This photo was reblogged from astronemma and originally by thescienceofreality.

earthandscience:

Bird Diversity 
A composite image showing the diversity of birds; up to 18 biological orders are depicted in this image (from top, left to right): Cuculiformes, Ciconiiformes, Phaethontiformes, Accipitriformes, Gruiformes, Galliformes, Anseriformes, Trochiliformes, Charadriiformes, Casuariiformes, Psittaciformes, Phoenicopteriformes, Sphenisciformes, Pelecaniformes, Suliformes, Coraciiformes, Strigiformes, Piciformes.

earthandscience:

Bird Diversity 

A composite image showing the diversity of birds; up to 18 biological orders are depicted in this image (from top, left to right): Cuculiformes, Ciconiiformes, Phaethontiformes, Accipitriformes, Gruiformes, Galliformes, Anseriformes, Trochiliformes, Charadriiformes, Casuariiformes, Psittaciformes, Phoenicopteriformes, Sphenisciformes, Pelecaniformes, Suliformes, Coraciiformes, Strigiformes, Piciformes.

16

September

154 notes

This photo was reblogged from earthandscience and originally by earthandscience.

infinity-imagined:

Loops of plasma on the Sun, four times wider than Earth.

infinity-imagined:

Loops of plasma on the Sun, four times wider than Earth.

(Source: gifovea)

16

September

12,791 notes

This photo was reblogged from likeaphysicist and originally by gifovea.

astronomy-to-zoology:

Phrynus marginemaculatus

…is a species of amblypygid (tailless whip scorpion) that is native to sub/tropical areas in North America and the Caribbean. Like other ambylpygids this species frequents dark and humid places during the day and is active at night. P.marginemaculatus is a predator and will uses its modified first pair of legs as sensory organs and its large pedipalps to catch prey. P.marginemaculatus is one of the few arachnids that shows signs of social behavior, as they have long term mother-offspring-sibling interactions.

Phylogeny

Animalia-Arthropoda-Chelicerata-Arachnida-Amblypygi-Phrynidae-Phrynus-P.marginemaculatus

Images(s): Michael Fanto

Phrynus marginemaculatus

13

September

536 notes

This photo was reblogged from rhamphotheca and originally by astronomy-to-zoology.

thebrainscoop:

Frog-legged leaf beetle (Sagra buqueti)
Every Thursday on The Field Museum’s Facebook page, entomologist and insect collections manager James Boone (who can be seen in this episode of The Brain Scoop, and in this video from The Field Revealed series) features a mind-blowingly amazing invertebrate for your enjoyment. I’ve yet to capture the insects in photograph as well as Daniel Le, so I’m totally just reposting this from over there — but be sure to check it out, and stay tuned for more soon!

Named because the back legs resemble those of a frog, it’s a member of the order Coleoptera, family Chrysomelidae, Sagra buqueti. Sagras do not jump but their strong, oversized hind legs along with dense hairs are used to hold the stems of their food plant while they eat. This beetle is metallic green with a red and gold band running along the inside margins of the elytra (the hard, outer-wing shells that encase the fragile, functional wings underneath [EG]). Frog-legged leaf beetles can be found in Peninsular Malaysia, Borneo, Java, Sumatra, and Philippines.
© The Field Museum, Photographer Daniel Le, Zoology - Division of Insects 2011



Sagra Buqueti

thebrainscoop:

Frog-legged leaf beetle (Sagra buqueti)

Every Thursday on The Field Museum’s Facebook pageentomologist and insect collections manager James Boone (who can be seen in this episode of The Brain Scoop, and in this video from The Field Revealed series) features a mind-blowingly amazing invertebrate for your enjoyment. I’ve yet to capture the insects in photograph as well as Daniel Le, so I’m totally just reposting this from over there — but be sure to check it out, and stay tuned for more soon!

Named because the back legs resemble those of a frog, it’s a member of the order Coleoptera, family Chrysomelidae, Sagra buqueti. Sagras do not jump but their strong, oversized hind legs along with dense hairs are used to hold the stems of their food plant while they eat. This beetle is metallic green with a red and gold band running along the inside margins of the elytra (the hard, outer-wing shells that encase the fragile, functional wings underneath [EG]). Frog-legged leaf beetles can be found in Peninsular Malaysia, Borneo, Java, Sumatra, and Philippines.

© The Field Museum, Photographer Daniel Le, Zoology - Division of Insects 2011

Sagra Buqueti

13

September

7,042 notes

This photo was reblogged from astronemma and originally by thebrainscoop.

thebrainscoop:

Frog-legged leaf beetle (Sagra buqueti)
Every Thursday on The Field Museum’s Facebook page, entomologist and insect collections manager James Boone (who can be seen in this episode of The Brain Scoop, and in this video from The Field Revealed series) features a mind-blowingly amazing invertebrate for your enjoyment. I’ve yet to capture the insects in photograph as well as Daniel Le, so I’m totally just reposting this from over there — but be sure to check it out, and stay tuned for more soon!

Named because the back legs resemble those of a frog, it’s a member of the order Coleoptera, family Chrysomelidae, Sagra buqueti. Sagras do not jump but their strong, oversized hind legs along with dense hairs are used to hold the stems of their food plant while they eat. This beetle is metallic green with a red and gold band running along the inside margins of the elytra (the hard, outer-wing shells that encase the fragile, functional wings underneath [EG]). Frog-legged leaf beetles can be found in Peninsular Malaysia, Borneo, Java, Sumatra, and Philippines.
© The Field Museum, Photographer Daniel Le, Zoology - Division of Insects 2011



Sagra Buqueti

thebrainscoop:

Frog-legged leaf beetle (Sagra buqueti)

Every Thursday on The Field Museum’s Facebook pageentomologist and insect collections manager James Boone (who can be seen in this episode of The Brain Scoop, and in this video from The Field Revealed series) features a mind-blowingly amazing invertebrate for your enjoyment. I’ve yet to capture the insects in photograph as well as Daniel Le, so I’m totally just reposting this from over there — but be sure to check it out, and stay tuned for more soon!

Named because the back legs resemble those of a frog, it’s a member of the order Coleoptera, family Chrysomelidae, Sagra buqueti. Sagras do not jump but their strong, oversized hind legs along with dense hairs are used to hold the stems of their food plant while they eat. This beetle is metallic green with a red and gold band running along the inside margins of the elytra (the hard, outer-wing shells that encase the fragile, functional wings underneath [EG]). Frog-legged leaf beetles can be found in Peninsular Malaysia, Borneo, Java, Sumatra, and Philippines.

© The Field Museum, Photographer Daniel Le, Zoology - Division of Insects 2011

Sagra Buqueti

13

September

7,042 notes

This photo was reblogged from astronemma and originally by thebrainscoop.